20 March 2020

Self-isolation soul soothing projects: Part 2

Hello everyone,

I am in the midst of letting you know ideas how to keep yourself distracted during the Coronavirus self-isolation days. This is Part 2 - if you missed Part 1, click here!


Projects if you’re in isolation at home 


And straight back into it. These projects are ones you can achieve with 120ml pots of Chalk Paint® which conceivably you may have lying around, or even opened tins of Chalk Paint®. Tip: if Chalk Paint® is old add some water and give it a really good stir. Keep adding water and it’ll go further! You can create a wash on furniture rather than a thick matt coat.


1) If painting is a good exercise for calming and mindfulness then sanding will help you get out some frustration! Plus, all that practice we’re having washing our hands for 20 seconds at a time has got my wrists up to anything, quite frankly! 

To paint this stool I used Chalk Paint® in Aubusson Blue and Lem Lem. For a two colour distress I like to use contrasting colours for maximum impact (I’m a maximum impact kinda gal) but sympathetic shades work well and are better suited for always-popular romantic or vintage looks. If you only have one Chalk Paint® colour you can still distress; varying the pressure you can reveal finished wood beneath - then with extra force sand right back to fresh wood. It’s a very rustic look. 


2) I have started to lose track of time but my husband loves hot cross buns so I do at least know that Easter is imminent! Maintaining fun family traditions and giving a sense of stability and normalcy is a big concern for parents when our children are going through stressful times. Building an Easter tree is fun and, honestly, is one of quite few crafts you can do with your children that actually always ends up looking quite beautiful! Send them into the garden to forage for branches, then spend the afternoon blowing out eggs and painting the shells to hang from the tree. This one is by my Stockist Deborah Meredith of Tea and Roses in the UK, and with its hopeful suggestion of new life, and indeed, chocolate, I think it would make a timely addition to any home. 

Deborah painted sheets of copy paper in Louis Blue and Antoinette. “Then let them dry. I went on walk and found an old branch in the woods. Great in the current situation when we need to get out if we are isolating! The flowers were the glued on with a hot glue gun. My daughter, aged  12, managed that with supervision. PVA could work just as well. Find easter decorations and hand them on, job done!”

Easter tree created by Deborah Meredith and her daughter with Chalk Paint®

3) Chalk Paint® picture frames! But, you cry, Annie, I don’t have any picture frames! Or I have, but I already painted them and I’m quite happy with them thank you very much. Well, firstly, I’m very happy for you and secondly, DON’T WORRY I THOUGHT OF THAT. I created these painterly picture frames on the walls and then blue tacked the pictures to the wall beneath. I think they’re witty and charming and they always make me smile. 


4) Painting plant pots is a no-brainer and because they’re cheap it’s a good activity to get the children going. This really is a doddle, and because Chalk Paint® goes on anything; plastic Ikea pots, terracotta, metal, you name it. Continue reaping the therapeutic benefits of wholesome home making during your quarantine by planting seeds in your new pots. Truly no greater joy then watching a plant grow and all you need is a sunny spot in your home or on your windowsill. 

Plant pot painted with Chalk Paint® in Lem Lem by Hayley Stuart

5) A potentially novel but very easy way to use Chalk Paint® is as a dye. This is a good option if you only have a little paint, though of course the end result won’t be as bold. Dip dye t-shirts, tea towels, and cushion covers with the children then leave to dry before machine washing on a hot setting and ironing to seal in the paint. 

Shibori cushions dyed by duo Abigail & Ryan Bell

6) Terrazzo is a very fashionable material consisting of chips of marble or granite set in concrete and polished to give a smooth surface. I’m suggesting this project because you can do a terrazzo effect over unpainted furniture or something previously painted, and you only use a little bit of each colour. There’s a link to my son Felix giving a demo – click here. Adding detail to something previously painted – whether by stencilling, or outlining the shape of a piece using a small paint brush, or adding a pop of colour inside - uses less paint but still gives the feeling of a refreshed furniture and home! Terrazzo is good because even if you only have teeny tiny increments of various colours left over…you’ve probably got enough to try this. 


7) Finally, this side table was painted with just a Mini Project Pack. So that’s 1 x project pot of Antoinette, 1 x project pot of Old White, 1 x 120ml White Chalk Paint® Wax and 1 x 120ml Clear Chalk Paint® Wax. And a brush! It’s fun to do and you can adjust the geometric shape to something else, or paint one drawer white, or paint the top, or mix the colours together for a lighter Antoinette. The world is your oyster, and the afternoon will fly by. Just know that you are going to be texting all of your friends with pictures of your upcycled piece and they may find this tiring (if this is likely may I suggest posting on Instagram or Facebook so I can see your work! I won’t get tired of seeing your projects ever).


I hope there’s something here for everyone, let me know in the comments of any crafty projects you’ve been involved in – Chalk Paint® or otherwise! Let’s make this page a bookmark of things for us to do whilst in quarantine, with stuff we have around the house already.

Sending much love to everyone.

Yours, 


Annie.

2 comments:

  1. thank you Annie. as always I've enjoyed reading your loving words and being inspired to paint. I've been a little down and feeling overwhelmed by everything so I haven't wanted to paint but now am inspired to tackle a small project to start and then see where it brings me.

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